Aussichtsturm Langer Otto
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In the Middle Ages, the two large forest areas of the Duchy of Lauenburg and Storman still formed one large forest, the so-called “hohe Heide” or “High Heath”. Today, the Hahnheide forest nature reserve in the north and the Sachsenwald forest in the south separate several villages, farmland and a district border. The smaller natural forest in Stormarn is hilly and varied due to the glacial moraine landscape: Steep slopes and wetlands make hiking and exploring a special adventure. In good weather, the “Langer Otto” observation tower is definitely worth a climb. From lofty heights, the expanse of the forest-green regions between Hamburg and Lübeck can be viewed in all their glory. A large part of this forest wealth is provided by the Sachsenwald forest in Lauenburg. At 60 square kilometres, it is the largest closed forest area in Schleswig-Holstein.

Moist and mysterious primeval forests await those who arrive at the moors of Stormarn. Saline springs in the Brenner Moor attract plants that otherwise only thrive near the coast. Their names are as unknown as they are poetic: “Milchkraut”, “Salzschuppenmiere” and “Strand-Dreizack”. Rare kingfishers, bluethroats and even the odd nightingale breed in its thicket. Near Ahrensburg, the “Stellmoor” – with its lush green-wet grounds – fills a so-called glacial gully, a valley that was driven into the landscape by glacial water tens of thousands of years ago. Further north, the renaturalised “Nienwohlder Moor” attracts rare bird species and dragonflies.

See im Stellmoor
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Lakes, Parks and Conservation areas

Hike through narrow paths or vast hilly landscapes, cycle past lakes and through forests, and picnic at the side of the road – in Schleswig-Holstein, six nature parks invite you on a discovery tour and a time out in nature.

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Luftaufnahme der Schlei-Region
© sh-tourismus.de/MOCANOX